Join us in Vancouver at IADR!

Heading to Vancouver next week for the IADR General Session?

Do you get frustrated seeing oral health organisations working in silos, duplicating work done by others, spending time and money answering questions no-one is asking?

Or learning there is ‘insufficient evidence’ or results are misinterpreted at the same time as good research languishes for years, or even decades, before being put into practice?

If so, meet with other like-minded individuals to hear about and discuss the best ways of working collaboratively to promote priority research, minimise duplication, share resources and data, support implementation, and improve oral health. Please join us at a symposium of the Global Evidence Ecosystem in Oral Health network on Wednesday 19 June at 10.15am (to 11.45 am) in Room 110 of the Vancouver Conference Centre.

We look forward to seeing you there and hearing your ideas for generating new solutions to old problems.

Please also plan to attend our GEEOH Business Meeting on Thursday 20 June at 10.45am (till 12.30pm) in Room 104 of the Vancouver Conference Centre.

Unclear evidence on the effectiveness of oral hygiene measures for those with intellectual disabilities

The removal of dental plaque by daily toothbrushing plays a major role in preventing tooth decay and gum disease, the two main causes of tooth loss. Toothbrushing is a skill that can be difficult for people with intellectual disabilities; they may require help and people who care for them may need training in how to help them. For this research, we used the World Health Organization’s definition of intellectual disability which is: “a significantly reduced ability to understand new or complex information and to learn and apply new skills. This results in a reduced ability to cope independently, and begins before adulthood, with a lasting effect on development.” Continue reading

The evidence on flossing and other methods of cleaning between the teeth

Tooth decay and gum diseases affect most people. They can cause pain, difficulties with eating and speaking, low self-esteem, and, in extreme cases, may lead to tooth loss and the need for surgery. The cost to health services of treating these diseases is very high.

As dental plaque is the root cause, it is important to remove plaque from teeth on a regular basis. While many people routinely brush their teeth to remove plaque up to the gum line, it is difficult for toothbrushes to reach into areas between teeth (‘interdental’), so interdental cleaning is often recommended as an extra step in personal oral hygiene routines. Different tools can be used for interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes, tooth cleaning sticks, and water pressure devices known as oral irrigators. Continue reading

Which strength of fluoride in toothpaste is most effective?

Tooth decay (caries) is a widespread disease, affecting billions of people worldwide. Fluoride has long been used to prevent decay, through a variety of different methods including toothpaste, water, milk, mouthrinses, tooth gels and varnish. Regular toothbrushing is recommended to prevent decay and other oral diseases, and toothbrushing for 2 minutes twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste is generally recommended. The typical strength of regular or family toothpaste is around 1000 to 1500 parts per million (ppm) fluoride, but many other strengths are available worldwide. There is no minimum fluoride concentration, but the maximum permissible fluoride concentration for a toothpaste varies according to age and country. Higher concentrations are rarely available over the counter, and are classed as a prescription‐only medicine. Stronger fluoride toothpaste may offer greater protection against decay but also increases the risk of fluorosis (enamel defects) in developing teeth. This is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2010. Continue reading

Treatments for managing knocked out and replanted permanent front teeth

Injuring your front teeth is common. One of the most severe injuries occurs when the tooth is knocked totally out of the mouth (avulsed). Often the best option is to replant the tooth as quickly as possible. This is true only for permanent teeth. Once replanted the tooth can heal in one of two ways if managed correctly. Ideally the ligaments around the root repair and the tooth can be expected to last as long as any other tooth, this is known as ‘periodontal healing’. When there is too much damage to the ligaments, healing occurs by bony replacement. Over a number of years, the adjacent bony socket will remodel the tooth (replace the root with bone) leaving the tooth with no root. Once the root is replaced the visible part of the tooth, the crown, will eventually give way and be lost. This is called ‘bony healing’. Bony healing causes significant problems in the medium term for children and treatments for this are the subject of a different Cochrane Review. A missing front tooth or teeth, as a result of not replanting an avulsed tooth, or as a result of bony healing over the medium to long term, can have a major effect on dental and facial ‘good looks’. This can affect the individual’s self-esteem and general social interaction, as well as how others think and see them. Continue reading