How effective are painkillers in reducing the discomfort caused by orthodontic treatment?

Pain is a common side effect of orthodontic treatment. The pain resulting from orthodontic treatment may differ depending on the amount of force applied and the type of braces used. It may also change over the first few days following treatment. Pain has been ranked as the worst aspect of treatment and is the most common reason for people wanting to discontinue orthodontic treatment. Painkillers, swallowed or applied directly to the sore areas of the mouth following treatment, are thought to relieve the pain, making brace treatment more comfortable and acceptable. These painkillers are often cheap, readily available, easy to use and do not cause serious side effects. Continue reading

New edition of the Cochrane Library features three new reviews from the Oral Health Group

The latest edition of the Cochrane Library for September 2012 features three new reviews from the Oral Health Group.

Irrigants for non-surgical root canal treatment in mature permanent teeth
Zbys Fedorowicz, Mona Nasser, Patrick Sequeira-Byron, Raphael Freitas de Souza, Ben Carter, Marc Heft

This new systematic review examines the antiseptic and antibacterial irrigating solutions available to help to eliminate infection during root canal treatment. 11 studies were included, with 851 participants. The review concludes that there was no difference between some of the irrigants or between the different strengths of individual irrigants.

Preoperative analgesics for additional pain relief in children and adolescents having dental treatment
Paul F Ashley, Susan Parekh, David R Moles, Prabhleen Anand, Amal Behbehani

This review examines whether or not to give children painkillers before dental treatment, in order to reduce pain afterwards. Five trials were included, with 190 participants. However, the available evidence was not sufficient to determine efficacy. There was some evidence that it could be of benefit before orthodontic treatment.

Systemic interventions for recurrent aphthous stomatitis (mouth ulcers)
Paul Brocklehurst, Martin Tickle, Anne-Marie Glenny, Michael A Lewis, Michael N Pemberton, Jennifer Taylor, Tanya Walsh, Philip Riley, Julian M Yates

25 trials with 21 interventions were included in this new systematic review on recurrent mouth ulcers. No single treatment was found to be effective and the results remain inconclusive.

Other highlights of the Cochrane Library, Issue 9, 2012 are: