Surgical treatments for mouth and throat cancer: uncertainty in the evidence

Oral cancer is among the most common cancers worldwide, with more than 400,000 new cases diagnosed in 2012. This review looks at oral cavity cancer (mouth cancer) and oropharyngeal cancer (throat cancer). The treatment of these cancers can involve surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy or a combination of two or all three therapies. This topic area was identified as a priority by the an expert working group for oral and maxillofacial surgery in 2014. Continue reading

Testing for oral cancer

shutterstock_177881789Oral cancer (OSCC – oral squamous cell carcinoma) often occurs after a condition called PMD (potentially malignant disorder), which can sometimes progress to cancer. If conditions such as oral cancer or PMD are identified early enough, outcomes for patients can be improved. The current method of diagnosing cancer of the mouth or lips involves the surgical removal of a piece of affected tissue that is sent to a laboratory for histological examination using a microscope (scalpel biopsy). This is painful for patients and involves a delay. The aim of this review was to find out the accuracy of three alternative diagnostic tests that are less invasive and provide more timely results. Continue reading

Cochrane resources on mouth cancer

shutterstock_163829423November is Mouth Cancer Action Month, and the Cochrane Oral Health Group has a range of systematic reviews dedicated to the topic. Mouth cancer can affect anybody; in the UK more than 6,700 people were diagnosed with the condition last year, and more than 2,000 people died from the disease, more than testicular and cervical cancer combined. Here’s what the evidence says… Continue reading