Dental treatments for preventing damage to the jawbones in people with cancer receiving radiotherapy to the head and neck

Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws is a serious problem that can happen after people have radiotherapy as part of their treatment for head and neck cancer. ORN refers to the death and exposure of bone that result from damage to the tissues due to being exposed to radiation. ORN is very difficult to treat and it is important that steps are taken to prevent it. In this review, we looked at any treatments that have been used to prevent ORN. Continue reading

Treatments for osteonecrosis of the jaw bones associated with bisphosphonate drugs

Woman face with visible jaws and teeths

Bisphosphonates are drugs very similar to pyrophosphate (a normal substance found in bone). They are used to lessen symptoms and complications due to the spread of cancer to the bones, and to prevent and treat fragile bones in osteoporosis (a conditon where tiny holes in the bones makes them brittle). These drugs can cause a rare but serious condition called bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw or ‘BRONJ’. BRONJ affects the healing of bone damage by interrupting the process of removing dead bone and laying down new bone. When this happens, parts or all of the jaw bone becomes friable (a bit like chalk), and eventually this dead bone can be exposed. This makes it difficult for people to eat, speak or brush their teeth, and it often causes severe pain. Many different treatments are currently used for BRONJ. They can be categorised as non-invasive treatments (such as antibiotics and mouth rinses), surgical approaches or “add-on” treatments used to enhance usual care (for example, ozone therapy or use of blood plasma that has been enriched with platelets). Different treatments may be combined. Continue reading

Three new titles registered by the Oral Health Group

acupuncture needles

Acupuncture is one of the options for preventing gag reflex, but how effective is it compared to other interventions? A new Cochrane review will consider the evidence. Photo published under GNU Free Documentation License.

The Cochrane Oral Health Group‘s editorial team met last week to consider which new titles to register. OHG have had a number of submissions over the last six months, and three titles have been registered by the Group. The editors identified them as priority topics, and agreed that they did not significantly overlap with any existing reviews:

Interventions for the prevention of osteoradionecrosis of the jaws in patients receiving head and neck radiotherapy

This review will be led by Dr. Amri Azarpazhooh from the University of Toronto in Canada. He will be joined on the team by Dr. Michael Duchnay, Dr. Grace Bradley, Dr. Howard Tenenbaum, Dr. Prakeshkumar S. Shah and Dr. Hamid Reza Raziee, who are all also based at the University of Toronto.

Prevention of gag reflex for patients undergoing dental treatment

Dr. Eachempati Prashanti from Melaka-Manipal Medical College in Malaysia will lead this new review. Dr. P. Renjith George, Professor Nagraj Sumanth Kumargere, Dr. Laxminarayan Karanth and Dr. Htoo Htoo Kyaw Soe will also be on the on the author team.

Autologous platelet concentrates for regeneration of periodontal defects

This review will be a collaboration between authors based in Italy and India. Dr. Massimo Del Fabbro from Università degli Studi di Milano leads the team, his colleagues Dr. Valentina Ceresoli and Dr. Caterina Ceci will join him as authors. Dr. Silvio Taschieri from University of Milan IRCCS Galazzi Orthopaedic Institute is also an author. The author team is completed by Dr. Saurav Panda, Professor Sheeja Varghese, Professor Malaiappa Sankari, Professor N. D. Jayakumar and Dr. Surenda Ramamoorthi from Saveetha University, India.

We look forward to publishing the protocols in the near future, watch this space!