Electrical conductance for the detection of early tooth decay

Dentists often aim to identify tooth decay that has already advanced to a level that needs a filling. If dentists were able to find tooth decay when it has only affected the outer layer of the tooth (enamel) then it is possible to stop the decay from spreading any further and prevent the need for fillings. It is also important to avoid a false‐positive result, when treatment may be provided when caries is absent. This is one of a series of reviews on diagnostic tests for dental caries, we also have reviews on imaging modalities, transillumination, fluorescence devices and tests to detect root caries.

The aim of this Cochrane Review was to find out how accurate electrical conductance devices (non‐invasive devices that send an electrical current to the surface of the tooth) are for detecting and diagnosing early tooth decay as part of the dental ‘check‐up’ for children and adults who visit their general dentist. Researchers in Cochrane included seven studies published between 1997 and 2018 to answer this question.

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Dental imaging methods for the detection of early tooth decay

Dentists often aim to identify tooth decay that has already advanced to a level which needs a filling. If dentists were able to find tooth decay when it has only affected the outer layer of the tooth (enamel) then it is possible to stop the decay from spreading any further and prevent the need for fillings. It is also important to avoid a false-positive result, when treatment may be given when caries is absent.

This Cochrane Review aimed to find out how accurate X-ray images and other types of dental imaging are for detecting early tooth decay as part of the dental ‘check-up’ for children and adults who visit their general dentist. Researchers in Cochrane included 77 studies published between 1986 and 2018 to answer this question.

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Light‐based tests for the detection and diagnosis of early tooth decay

Dentists often aim to identify tooth decay that has already advanced to a level which needs a filling. If dentists were able to find tooth decay when it has only affected the outer layer of the tooth (enamel) then it is possible to stop the decay from spreading any further and prevent the need for fillings. It is also important to avoid a false‐positive result, when treatment may be provided when caries is absent.

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How accurate are fluorescence devices for detecting and diagnosing early tooth decay?

Dentist holding caries detector with fluorescent light for checking the teeth.

Dentists often aim to identify tooth decay that has already advanced to a level which needs a filling. If dentists were able to find tooth decay when it has only affected the outer layer of the tooth then it is possible to stop the decay from spreading any further and prevent the need for fillings. It is also important to avoid a false-positive result, when treatment may be provided when caries is absent.

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Diagnostic tools for detecting root caries: uncertain evidence

Root caries (tooth decay on the root of a tooth) is a well-recognised disease, that is on the increase as populations grow older and keep more of their natural teeth into later life. Like coronal caries (tooth decay on the crown of the tooth), root caries can be associated with pain, discomfort, and tooth loss, which can contribute to poorer oral health-related quality of life in the elderly. Detecting caries earlier can mean invasive treatment is needed, where more tooth tissue can be preserved. It could also mean less cost to the patient and to healthcare services.

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Taking action on oral cancer

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Biopsy of a highly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth

Cancer of the mouth is a serious condition and only half of those that develop the disease survive after five years. It is the sixth most common cancer across the world. People who are heavy drinkers and also smoke have 38 times more risk of developing oral cancer than those who do neither. Geographic variation in the occurrence of oral cancer around the world is wide. It is the most common cancer for men in India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan and 30% of all new cases of cancer in these countries are oral cancer. Death rates from oral cancer and the negative effects of the disease are high and increasing compared with other forms of cancer, such as breast or colon cancer.

This month is Mouth Cancer Action Month, and the Cochrane Oral Health Group has published a new review and a review update on the diagnosis of oral cancer in The Cochrane Library. Continue reading